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Article
June 1932

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF VOLUME AND HEMOGLOBIN CONTENT OF THE RED BLOOD CELL

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Cleveland Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(6):1032-1057. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150130155013
Abstract

In 1864, Welcher1 described the first method for determining the volume of the erythrocyte and measured in cubic microns the volume of the normal cell of man and of many lower animals. By his ingenious, but inaccurate, method, Welcher also showed that in chlorosis the red cells may be smaller than normal, and thus he made the first clinical application of the determination of the volume of the erythrocyte. Hayem,2 the father of clinical hematology, early recognized the importance of variation in the size of the red cells although he measured only the diameter. Laache,3 in the first monograph on anemia, measured the diameter of the red cells in every case of anemia, and showed especially the great significance of macrocytosis of the erythrocytes in pernicious anemia. Malassez,4 one of the important early contributors to hematology, reported the hemoglobin content in micromicrograms per cell in different

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