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Article
August 1932

HYPERPARATHYROIDISM WITHOUT PARATHYROID TUMORREPORT OF A CASE IMPROVED BY PARTIAL PARATHYROIDECTOMY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Clinic of the Hospital, and the Metabolic Section of the William Pepper Laboratory of Clinical Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(2):317-327. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150150149014
Abstract

The patient whose clinical record follows presented certain features that have recently been grouped together in the syndrome of hyperparathyroidism. She came under observation bedridden because of pain in the bones and muscular weakness. Examination disclosed extensive decalcification of the skeleton and an abnormally high blood calcium with excessive daily calcium output. Parathyroid tumor was searched for and none found. Removal of one apparently normal parathyroid gland produced no change in the symptoms or laboratory findings. When the surgeon, however, subsequently excised two similar anatomically normal glands on the opposite side, symptomatic improvement and a remarkable recalcification of the skeleton followed. The patient developed tetany postoperatively, which, however, gradually became more and more easily controlled, so that, twenty-two weeks after entry, she could be discharged competent to reenter her household routine. It is to emphasize the clinical significance of hyperparathyroidism without tumor that this case is being reported.

A brief

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