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Article
October 1932

KIDNEY WEIGHT, BODY SIZE AND RENAL FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

LA JOLLA, CALIF.

From the Scripps Metabolic Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(4):590-594. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150170082008
Abstract

In 1916, Addis1 introduced the determination of the ratioIn 1916, Addis1 introduced the determination of the ratio under certain standard conditions as a measure ofthe amount of functioning renal tissue. The adequacy of this ratio as measured under the standard conditions for this purpose was demonstrated in a number of ways. It is a reasonable measure of renal function;2 the variation in "experimental nephritis" was found3 to agree well with the structural changes in the kidneys, and the compensatory renal hypertrophy as measured by the ratio coincided with the anatomic measurements.4 Lastly, it was shown5 that in rabbits there existed a linear relationship between the magnitude of the ratio and the weight of the kidneys, an observation since confirmed for the rat6 and the dog.7 Taylor, Drury and Addis5 found that in rabbits the kidney weight varied directly in proportion to the body surface and bore a more constant relation to this figure than to any under certain standard conditions as a measure ofthe amount of functioning renal tissue. The adequacy of this ratio as measured under the standard conditions for this purpose was demonstrated in a number of ways. It is a reasonable measure of renal function;2 the variation in "experimental nephritis" was found3 to agree well with the structural changes in the kidneys, and the compensatory renal hypertrophy as measured by the ratio coincided with the anatomic measurements.4 Lastly, it was shown5 that in rabbits there existed a linear relationship between the magnitude of the ratio and the weight of the kidneys, an observation since confirmed for the rat6 and the dog.7 Taylor, Drury and Addis5 found that in rabbits the kidney weight varied directly in proportion to the body surface and bore a more constant relation to this figure than to any

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