[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1932

RELATION OF SUGAR TO CHOLESTEROL IN THE BLOOD

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Medicine, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(5):684-689. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150180037003
Abstract

It is known that in diabetes mellitus there is often a distinct increase in the level of both the blood sugar and the plasma cholesterol. The relationship between the fluctuations of these two substances in the blood in diabetes mellitus is not constant, as shown by many observers (Boyd,1 Joslin, Bloor and Gray,2 Gray,3 Rabinowitch,4 and White and Hunt5). McCrudden and Sargent6 studied the blood cholesterol and sugar in a number of pathologic states and were not able to demonstrate any constant correlation. There are several complicating factors which may arise in the course of diabetes mellitus that may raise either the blood sugar or the plasma cholesterol or both. Thus it is established that severe acidosis and diabetic coma, malnutrition, overnutrition and a high fat intake continued over a long period may bring about a hypercholesterolemia (Bloor7), though the blood sugar may be elevated in some

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×