[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1932

STENOSIS OF THE SUPERIOR VENA CAVA DUE TO MEDIASTINAL TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the medical service, Lutheran Deaconess Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(5):759-765. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150180112007
Abstract

Obstruction of the superior vena cava is the cause of the outstanding symptoms in many cases of mediastinal pathologic conditions. However, isolated stenosis of this vessel is distinctly rare.

Interference with the return flow of blood to the heart through the superior vena cava may arise from a wide variety of conditions in the mediastinum or in the vessel itself.

Of these causes, aneurysm,1 almost universally of the aorta, is the most common. This lesion may compress and thereby result in slow partial mechanical obstruction of the superior vena cava and give rise to a train of symptoms due to this compression and compression of other mediastinal structures, such as the recurrent laryngeal nerves, trachea and esophagus. On the other hand, an aneurysm of the aorta may perforate into the vein, producing sudden functional stenosis of the vena cava as a result of the tremendous head pressure opposing the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×