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Article
December 1932

MITOTIC MYELOCYTES IN THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN A CASE OF MYELOID LEUKEMIA IN A NEGRO

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

From the Grady Hospital, Emory University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(6):908-912. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150190110009
Abstract

Indirect or mitotic cell division of nongranular leukoblasts occurs rather frequently in certain types or stages of leukemia. The presence of mitotic leukoblasts in the peripheral blood has been the subject of several recent reports (Dock, Tannhauser, Bowcock and Bishop, Groat, Rabinovici, Bowcock and Dickson).1 Groat's case showed all stages of mitosis in the peripheral blood, from prophase through telephase to daughter cells; these cells were free from granules.

I am unable to find mention of the occurrence of granular mitotic myelocytes in the peripheral blood, except in the report of Dock. Hirschfeld2 illustrated mitotic myelocytes in a bone marrow smear. One might question the ability of a cell as mature as a myelocyte to undergo mitotic division.

The following case is of interest because smears from the peripheral blood showed frequent examples of all stages of mitosis in cells containing neutrophilic granules. The case is of further

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