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Article
September 1933

EFFECT ON IDIOPATHIC HYPOCHROMIC ANEMIA OF BEEF STEAK (HAMBURGER STEAK) DIGESTED WITH NORMAL GASTRIC JUICE

Author Affiliations

ALBANY, N. Y.; BALTIMORE

From the Medical Clinic, the School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1933;52(3):464-470. doi:10.1001/archinte.1933.00160030125010
Abstract

The reports of cases of idiopathic hypochromic anemia continue to increase, but controversy exists, nevertheless, as to whether or not this condition can be accepted as a clinical entity. Some authors1 think of this anemia as an atypical form of pernicious anemia. Others consider that it is a form of anemia resulting from undiscovered chronic loss of blood. Opinions2 have been expressed that the anemia is the result of dietary deficiencies or that it is related to chlorosis, once so common in young girls. The view most generally held, however, is that the anemia and the clinical picture are the result of some deficiency in gastric secretion3 or the consequence of an inability of the gastrointestinal tract to absorb from the food substances necessary for the formation of blood.4

In 1929, Castle5 showed that when beef steak properly digested with normal gastric juice was fed

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