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Article
January 1934

CLINICAL CONSIDERATION OF THE ETIOLOGY OF PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(1):97-119. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160070102009
Abstract

Benign duodenal, gastric and anastomotic ulcers are usually referred to as peptic ulcers because they are invariably to be found in regions subjected to the bathing influence of the acid chyme and because it is assumed that the eroding action of the gastric juice is of paramount significance in their development. There are still many factors regarding the etiology, course and chronicity of the lesions which remain imperfectly understood. Even a cursory review of the literature on the subject is convincing evidence of the complexity of the problem. It is my purpose here to review briefly a few of the more important hypotheses advanced to explain the genesis and the course of peptic ulcer. I shall attempt also to arrange the various hypotheses so as to make them apply in a practical manner to the problem of ulcer in man.

HYPOTHESES CONCERNING THE CAUSE OF PEPTIC ULCER 

Circulatory Disturbances.  —Virchow

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