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Article
August 1934

MODIFYING ACTION OF CALCIUM AND SODIUM BICARBONATE ON SALICYLATE INTOXICATION

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(2):308-312. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160140151009
Abstract

In an investigation of the properties and pharmacologic action of calcium acetylsalicylate1 there were indications of certain advantages that this salt had over acetylsalicylic acid. It appeared to be less toxic, particularly with reference to the induction of albuminuria. However, calcium acetylsalicylate proved to be unstable, and the present inquiry was undertaken to determine whether a mixture of a calcium salt with acetylsalicylic acid would be correspondingly less toxic than acetylsalicylic acid alone.

Eighteen normal healthy dogs were selected which after repeated examination were proved to have albumin-free urine (Heller's test). Each dog received 100 mg. of acetylsalicylic acid, U. S. P., per kilogram three times a day in gelatin capsules. One group of six dogs received, in addition, an equal amount of calcium gluconate, and another group of six an equal amount of sodium bicarbonate, chemically pure. The dogs were watched carefully for: (1) vomiting; (2) albuminuria; (3)

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