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Article
November 1934

CHANGES IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM RESULTING FROM CONVULSIONS DUE TO HYPERINSULINISM

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(5):694-701. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160170037003
Abstract

A series of experiments with animals was designed to investigate whether or not repeated convulsions for varying periods of time, induced artificially by the production of hyperinsulinism, would lead to organic lesions in the brain. Convulsions are generally classified as organic when there are associated with them demonstrable intracranial pathologic conditions, and as functional when no such evidence exists.

It is still a question whether convulsions per se lead to definite organic cerebral lesions. Spielmeyer1 showed that focal anatomic lesions of the necrobiotic type in the brain can result from a purely functional circulatory disturbance. Furthermore, he noted similar lesions associated with convulsions in a variety of intoxications, such as eclampsia of pregnancy, pseudo-uremia, carbon monoxide intoxication, chloroform narcosis and infections, in none of which there was any organic occlusion of a cerebral vessel. All of these he regarded as due to vasomotor disturbances.

Foster Kennedy, in a discussion

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