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Article
November 1934

NITROGEN AND SULPHUR METABOLISM IN BRIGHT'S DISEASEV. METABOLIC STUDY OF A PATIENT WITH EDEMA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the medical clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;54(5):764-769. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160170107009
Abstract

Patients suffering from chronic nephritis with renal edema tend to retain both nitrogen and sulphur when fed diets high in protein,1 and even retain crystalline urea.2 On the other hand, it has been shown that patients with Bright's disease without renal edema tend toward a negative sulphur and nitrogen balance as the disease progresses.3 The mechanism of these reactions is not clear, as it has been impossible to demonstrate an elevation of the nonprotein nitrogen level of the blood in patients retaining large quantities, whereas in patients without renal edema the nonprotein nitrogen level of the blood rises despite the negative balance. In the study of patients with renal edema it can be shown by a simple calculation that if the retained nitrogen and sulphur or urea is equally distributed throughout the body, easily measurable quantities should be demonstrable in the blood. It has always been assumed

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