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Article
February 1935

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RHEUMATIC AND SUBACUTE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1935;55(2):173-185. doi:10.1001/archinte.1935.00160200003001
Abstract

It is well known that a heart once damaged by rheumatic disease is more liable to subsequent infection, especially with nonhemolytic streptococci. In a review of 330 cases of subacute bacterial endocarditis, Blumer1 found that 168, or 50 per cent, of the patients had a definite history of rheumatism (140), chorea (10) and tonsillitis (18). In 20 cases of streptococcus viridans endocarditis that were analyzed by Thayer2a and that came to necropsy, 65 per cent of the patients had a history of rheumatism or chorea.2b In a survey of 115 cases of subacute bacterial endocarditis collected from the records of the Presbyterian Hospital (New York), Lamb3 noted 94 patients (82 per cent) who were known to have had cardiac damage, and of these, 69, or 60 per cent of the entire series, gave a history of rheumatism. In a group of 111 cases of subacute bacterial

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