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Article
March 1936

RELATIONSHIP OF FELTY'S AND ALLIED SYNDROMES TO SEPSIS LENTA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the College of Medicine, the University of Illinois and the departments of medicine and of pathology, Cook County Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;57(3):576-600. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170070101010
Abstract

In 1924, Felty1 described the occurrence in five middle-aged adults of a syndrome characterized by chronic deforming arthritis, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, leukopenia and cutaneous pigmentation. Secondary anemia was present in all but one case, and in two patients low grade fever was detected. Felty apparently assumed that the clinical picture he had described had hitherto been unobserved in adults and offered two explanations for this unusual syndrome, namely, that the manifestations are part of one pathologic process, the counterpart in the adult of Still's disease of childhood, and that the syndrome is merely the confusion of two separate clinical entities, i. e., chronic arthritis and Banti's disease, occurring coincidentally in the same person. Felty favored the former explanation chiefly on the basis of the law of probability and concluded that he was dealing with a distinct clinical entity caused by a "noxa which simultaneously affects the joints, spleen and blood

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