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Article
April 1936

RELATIVE VALUES OF CAFFEINE AND HYPERTONIC DEXTROSE AND SALINE SOLUTIONS IN REDUCING CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Service of Dr. Israel Strauss at the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;57(4):749-757. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170080103007
Abstract

The intravenous injection of a hypertonic solution of dextrose for the purpose of reducing the cerebrospinal fluid pressure is a common procedure in the treatment of neurologic disturbances, although few direct observations of its effects have been reported in the literature. The procedure is based mainly on a number of experimental studies on animals.1 During exploratory craniotomy, Fay2 observed a decrease in the dural tension following the intravenous administration of a 15 per cent saline solution. A number of observers have measured the effect of these solutions by the application of a tambour next to postoperative cranial defects or herniations, but their results are contradictory. Ebaugh and Stevenson3 noted a prolonged fall in pressure after the intravenous administration of 200 cc. of a 30 per cent dextrose solution, while Stevenson and his associates4 noted only a slight effect. Foley5 used a 15 per cent saline solution

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