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Article
December 1936

A SPECIFIC INFECTION CHARACTERIZED BY MULTIPLE ULCERS OF THE SMALL INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Pathology, the Vanderbilt University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1936;58(6):978-992. doi:10.1001/archinte.1936.00170160024002
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present an unusual and, as far as I know, unique infectious disease, which was characterized especially by a peculiar type of ulceration of the small intestine, from which a specific bacillus was isolated. This organism was capable of reproducing the disease and causing similar lesions in the monkey (Macacus rhesus).

In addition to enteritis there were other specific lesions, such as cholecystitis, cholangeitis, pneumonitis, necrosis of the bone marrow and interstitial nephritis, all of which were reproduced in the monkey after the intravenous injection of the gram-negative bacillus isolated from the patient's bile and intestine.

The clinical features of the case also were anomalous and presented many problems of diagnostic interest, as the following abstract will show.

History.  —Mrs. E. B., a 54 year old inhabitant of a small town in the middle of the state of Tennessee, was admitted to the Vanderbilt

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