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Article
July 1937

CARCINOMA OF THE ISLANDS OF LANGERHANS WITH HYPOGLYCEMIA AND HYPERINSULINISM

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Pathology; ROCHESTER, MINN.; SALT LAKE CITY

From the Division of Biochemistry, the Mayo Foundation.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(1):88-99. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180010093007
Abstract

The syndrome commonly known as spontaneous hypoglycemia was recognized by Seale Harris1 in 1924 and was attributed by him to "hyperinsulinism," in contrast to the supposed "hypo-insulinism" of diabetes. The possibility of true hyperinsulinism was first demonstrated in 1927 by Wilder, Allan, Power and Robertson2 in a report of a case of severe hypoglycemia in which carcinoma of the islands of Langerhans with extensive metastasis to the liver and lymph nodes was noted at necropsy. The cells of the metastatic nodules in the liver bore a striking resemblance to the cells of the islands of Langerhans, and an extract of the hepatic nodules was found to possess the property of markedly lowering the concentration of sugar in the blood when injected into rabbits.

Since that report there have appeared in the literature (recently reviewed by Whipple and Frantz3 and by Wilder4) numerous descriptions of cases of

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