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Article
November 1937

CHRONIC ARSENICAL POISONING DURING THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Hematology, the University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(5):846-866. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180050113008
Abstract

The value of inorganic arsenical preparations in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia was neglected in the American medical literature from the time that roentgen therapy was suggested by Nicholas Senn1 until the report of Forkner and Scott2 in 1931. The 1931 report described a favorable reaction in nine of ten patients receiving solution of potassium arsenite in subtoxic amounts. Later Forkner3 described its successful use in eighteen patients, none of whom had received the drug for longer than one year. In 1936 Stephens and Lawrence4 reported on seven patients treated successfully for about four years or less. The early authors encountered no complications more serious than transient conjunctivitis, coryza, nausea and diarrhea. One patient had herpes zoster while taking arsenic, but the authors considered that this was as likely to be a feature of the leukemia as a result of the treatment. One of the

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