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Article
December 1937

SYMPATHECTOMY FOR PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Surgery, the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and St. Luke's Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1937;60(6):990-1001. doi:10.1001/archinte.1937.00180060043005
Abstract

A number of arguments have been brought forward against the use of sympathectomy in the treatment of peripheral circulatory disturbances. The purpose of this communication is to examine the validity of these objections in the light of personal experience. Fifty patients have been subjected in my clinic to one hundred and twenty-six sympathectomies (table 1). However, the data for only twenty-four

of these patients, with forty-six sympathectomies, have been used for the evaluation of results, as these patients have been followed for one year or more since operation, the longest period of observation being seven years. Study of the patients more recently operated on has served only to clarify the indications and lead to modifications of the technical procedures. In the main, four arguments are brought forward against sympathectomy: 1. The peripheral circulation, although temporarily modified after the operation, returns to a preoperative level within from sixteen to twenty-one days.

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