[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1938

COCCIDIOIDES INFECTION (COCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS)II. THE PRIMARY TYPE OF INFECTION

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO; BAKERSFIELD, CALIF.

From the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, San Francisco, and the Kern County Department of Public Health, Bakersfield, Calif.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1938;62(5):853-871. doi:10.1001/archinte.1938.00180160132011
Abstract

Ever since coccidioidal infection has been known to be due to a fungus,1 it has been recognized that there are two distinct cycles of development of the infecting organism: the form which occurs when the organism has infected animal tissues, and the one which occurs when the organism grows on culture medium and, presumably, in nature. The first of these cycles was that observed when infected human beings came under clinical observation. The parasitic organism was seen as a double-contoured spherule, averaging about 30 microns in diameter, which reproduced by endosporulation, the endospores being released into the tissues by rupture of the wall of the mother spherule. The spherules so closely resembled Coccidia that it was at first believed that they belonged to the protozoan group, and they were called Coccidioides, i. e., like Coccidia; hence the name. The second cycle occurs when the organism grows outside the body,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×