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Article
January 1940

EFFECT OF THE RETICULOCYTOGENIC PRINCIPLE IN URINE IN THE TREATMENT OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois, and the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Louisville School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(1):21-25. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190070031002
Abstract

Normal human urine contains a substance which, like the antipernicious anemia principle in liver, is reticulocytogenic for the pigeon, rat and guinea pig.1 An extract of normal human urine prepared by a method basically that used for liver extracts has been found to be reticulocytogenic for the pigeon.2 Decastello3 reported that normal human urine administered intramuscularly or rectally is effective in the treatment of pernicious anemia, and McCann4 found that kidney given by mouth is effective. These findings suggested the possible identity or similarity of the reticulocytogenic principle in urine and the hemopoietic principle in liver. In view of the nonspecificity of the pigeon, rat and guinea pig bioassay methods for the hemopoietic principle in liver, the possibility of urinary excretion of the principle was studied by administering the urine extract previously mentioned orally and intramuscularly to patients with pernicious anemia. A preliminary report of the effect of intramuscular injections of

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