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Article
February 1940

COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VALVULAR CALCIFICATIONS IN RHEUMATIC AND IN NONRHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Montefiore Hospital for Chronic Diseases, New York, and the Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(2):279-290. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190080061004
Abstract

The increasing frequency of the diagnosis of calcifications of the cardiac valves during life makes it desirable to discuss not only their causation but also their possible clinical significance.

Thus far the greatest emphasis has been placed on calcifications of the aortic valve. Christian1 first indicated that aortic stenosis with calcification of the cusps might be regarded as a definite clinical entity, possibly of rheumatic origin. Clawson, Noble and Lufkin2 also stated that the clinical manifestations of the "calcified aortic nodular deformity" are sufficiently characteristic to warrant its designation as a separate entity, predominantly of a rheumatic nature. Willius and Camp3 at first did not agree with the theory of a rheumatic causation, but after further investigation Dry and Willius4 concluded that the etiologic factor was rheumatic. Other investigators, notably Mönckberg, Sohval and Gross and Margolies, Ziellessen and Barnes,5 stated the belief that calcification of the aortic valve is not

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