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Article
February 1940

GASTROSCOPY AND THE PHYTOBEZOARREPORT OF A CASE OF DIOSPYROBEZOAR

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

From the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Tulane University, and the Gastroenterology Clinic, Touro Infirmary.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;65(2):368-374. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190080150009
Abstract

Phytobezoars are sufficiently rare to justify our being stimulated to publication of a case recently observed. When DeBakey and Ochsner1 completed their critical analysis of the literature on 311 intragastric foreign bodies, they were able to report only 126 instances of phytobezoar.

Bezoars have always been of considerable interest and have from antiquity been prized by their discoverers. In the earlier days they were valued as charms and as curative agents. Today they serve as excellent exhibits for medical meetings. Numerous manuscripts reviewing their history, method of formation, character, diagnosis and treatment have appeared in the literature.2

Since these phases have been studied and reported on adequately, we shall confine our discussion to the most recent advance in the study of bezoars; the use of the gastroscope. It was first reported in 1936 by Moersch,3 who viewed a phytobezoar in situ with the flexible gastroscope.

Moersch's patient

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