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Article
August 1940

Textbook of Pathology: A Correlation of Clinical Observations and Pathological Findings.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1940;66(2):527-528. doi:10.1001/archinte.1940.00190140235012

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Abstract

The appearance of a new book on a subject about which there already exists a not inconsiderable number of textbooks requires a certain amount of explanation. The authors have given this in their preface. It is their purpose, they say, to stress "the relationship between pathologic physiology and altered tissue changes or morbid anatomy." The description of the disturbance in physiologic processes which results from a pathologic process somewhere in the body is a feature which has been completely neglected in most textbooks of pathology. The physician obtains but little help from most of the books on pathology when he wants to correlate the symptom complex or the symptoms with the underlying morbid anatomy. Duval and Schattenberg make a very excellent attempt to rectify this deficiency. In practically every section of the book, following the gross and microscopic appearance of a diseased organ, there is a subsection which is captioned

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