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Article
March 1941

PATHOGENESIS AND PATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN PEPTIC ULCER, AND PRODUCTION OF PAIN

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Jewish Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(3):620-636. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200030150011
Abstract

Various ideas have been propounded from time to time to account for the development of gastroduodenal ulceration, but the underlying agent or agents are still undetermined. It is true that under certain conditions peptic ulcer will develop in the human being or that ulcers may be produced experimentally in animals, but either occurrence throws little light on the real problem of the condition. The peculiar and almost constant localization of the lesion in the lesser curvature just proximal to the pylorus has been given special etiologic significance, and it has been often correlated with an assumed special exposure of this part of the stomach to irritation resulting from the strongly acid chyme.

A review of the literature reveals a wide discussion in reference to the pathologic anatomy and symptomatology of peptic ulcer. The symptom most commonly encountered in this lesion consists of pain, invariably described as burning (heart burn) in

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