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Article
April 1941

EFFECT OF EDEMA AND INTEGUMENTARY INFILTRATIONS ON BASAL METABOLISM, ELECTROCARDIOGRAM AND BLOOD CHOLESTEROL

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Second Medical Service, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(4):828-845. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200040121009
Abstract

The most obvious example of a lowering of basal metabolism occurring in an edematous state is witnessed in the so-called nephroses, or better termed "hypoproteinemias." Because of this association, Epstein1 regarded "nephrosis" as a metabolic disease. Indeed, the remarkable tolerance of patients with such a condition for thyroid preparations seemed to justify this contention. However, with the evolution of the broader concept of the "nephrosis" it soon became apparent that the disease could not be a primary metabolic disorder, because a lowered basal metabolism accompanies most conditions, both renal and extrarenal, in which hypoproteinemia is a prominent finding. In other words, the lowered basal metabolism is a secondary and not a primary phenomenon, and the immediate issue with which this study is concerned is the determination of the factor or factors which cause its depression. This in turn leads to a larger problem, namely, the relation of lowered metabolism

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