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Article
May 1941

USE OF SULFANILAMIDE AND SULFAPYRIDINE IN THERAPY OF SUBACUTE BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS

Author Affiliations

With the Collaboration of Arthur Selzer, M.D., and Patricia McLean, B.A.; SAN FRANCISCO

From the Harold Brunn Institute for Cardiovascular Research, Mount Zion Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(5):921-938. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200050029003
Abstract

With the introduction of the original prontosil (the hydrochloride of 4-sulfamido-2', 4'-diaminoazobenzene) by Domagk1 and the confirmation of the action of sulfanilamide and its derivatives by other observers,2 a new era in chemotherapy was begun. The discovery of sulfanilamide as the effective principle in the prontosil molecule and the widespread use of this drug in treatment of infections other than those due to the hemolytic streptococcus quickly followed. A further impetus was given to progress in this renascent field in 1938 by the clinical introduction of sulfapyridine (2-[paraaminobenzenesulfonamido] pyridine) by Whitby,3 who demonstrated its striking efficacy in treatment not only of infections due to the pneumococcus but also of those due to the hemolytic streptococcus. These initial observations of Whitby, like those of Domagk, were quickly and amply confirmed in the last several years by numerous workers.4

Despite this rapid advance in the treatment of various

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