June 1941

The Endocrine Function of Iodine.

Author Affiliations

By William Thomas Salter. Price, $3.50. Pp. 351, with 40 illustrations. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1940.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1941;67(6):1286. doi:10.1001/archinte.1941.00200060189010

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In this monograph the function of iodine in the endocrine system is correlated with the involved chemical, pathologic and experimental and clinical physiologic aspects. A selective, rather than exhaustive, consideration of the literature on thyroid activity comprises the major part of the book. Using iodine as the common denominator, the author makes an orderly approach to a mass of unorganized data and thereby attains a clearcut statementof clinical and experimental progress in the field.

Considering the author's background, it is neither unexpected nor unwarranted that considerable space is devoted to the special properties and development of knowledge of thyroglobulin. The thyroid-pituitary relationships are considered extensively. Recent advances in determinations of iodine in the blood, including the differentiation of the organic and inorganic forms, are evaluated and discussed. The treatment of the role of the hypothalamus serves to demonstrate the author's liberal approach to the subject of iodine metabolism. In this

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