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Article
July 1942

STENOSIS OF THE INFUNDIBULUM

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Departments of Pathology and Medicine, Michael Reese Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(1):53-60. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200190063004
Abstract

Although stenosis of the pulmonary tract with transposition is one of the most common anomalies encountered in the heart, isolated stenosis of the lower bulbar orifice without transposition is relatively rare. We were able to study clinically over an extended period a patient who on postmortem examination presented this type of anomaly.

REPORT OF A CASE 

Clinical Observations.  —This woman was first seen by one of us (S. S.) in 1929 at the age of 25. She gave a history of heart disease since birth. She came to inquire as to the advisability of becoming pregnant. Her symptoms were slight dyspnea on exertion for years, moderate swelling of the ankles periodically and easy tiring. She had never been incapacitated because of these complaints. She had had typhoid fever in 1910 and scarlet fever with nephritis in 1916.Examination in 1929 revealed nothing abnormal except the cardiac condition. On percussion the

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