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Article
July 1942

URIC ACID PARTITION IN GOUT AND IN HEPATIC DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Services, the Nutrition Clinic, the Department of Chemistry Laboratories of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1942;70(1):101-120. doi:10.1001/archinte.1942.00200190111007
Abstract

The problem of solubility of uric acid and urates in body fluids has been the subject of extensive studies. Uric acid is weak and dissolves in water in small amounts only. Sodium urate is more easily soluble,1 but its solubility is depressed by the addition of sodium chloride. A physiologic solution of sodium chloride dissolves only one tenth of the amount soluble in distilled water.2 The solubility of sodium urate in body fluids is much higher, however, than the determination of its solubility in physiologic solution of sodium chloride would suggest. Schade and Boden3 observed that sodium urate solutions were characterized by properties specific for colloidal solutions, such as opalescence, gel formation and the Tyndall phenomenon (see also Bechhold and Ziegler4). This suggested the existence of a colloidal form of uric acid in body fluids (compare, however, Hoeber5). Freundlich and Farmer-Loeb6 examined the electrical conductivity of sodium

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