[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.124.106. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1943

STORAGE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF TISSUE GLYCOGEN IN HEALTH AND IN DISEASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Michael Reese Hospital, and the Department of Physiology, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;71(2):219-229. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210020085006
Abstract

The glycogen in animal tissues has engaged the attention of physiologists since the early work of Claude Bernard. Its significance in health and in disease has also been the subject of scattered observations by clinical investigators since that time. This presentation is an attempt to summarize and correlate such physiologic and clinical aspects of the subject as may be of interest and importance to the practicing physician.

NATURE OF GLYCOGEN  Glycogen is a condensation product, or polymer, of dextrose (d-glucose). A molecule of glycogen is composed of twelve units of dextrose. some water being withdrawn in the process of condensation.1 This product is not peculiar to animal tissue. Starch is similar in its structure and chemistry. However, within the living cell glycogen exists in a characteristic state, which is different from that of glycogen in the chemist's bottle or of starch on the grocer's shelf. In its natural

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×