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Article
July 1943

CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF WEIL'S DISEASE WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO MENINGITIS

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Departments of Internal Medicine of Wayne University College of Medicine and City of Detroit Receiving Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1943;72(1):18-30. doi:10.1001/archinte.1943.00210070026002
Abstract

Before 1935 only 11 cases of Weil's disease had been reported from the United States.1 Since that time additional cases have been reported with increasing rapidity.2 Several excellent summaries3 of the clinical manifestations of the disease have also appeared in the American and foreign literature. Nevertheless it is still not widely appreciated in America that this malady may occur in a meningitic form and that jaundice is not a necessary concomitant.

HISTORY AND INCIDENCE OF MENINGITIS IN WEIL'S DISEASE  What would appear to be the first recorded case of meningitis in Weil's disease was reported by Laubry and Parvu,4 of Paris, France, in October 1910. These authors described 3 atypical cases of lymphocytic meningitis; 1 of the patients had jaundice and a clinical course which simulated that of Weil's disease. One week later Gullain and Richet5 described, and illustrated with 4 case reports, a distinct

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