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February 1944

GASTROENTEROLOGYA REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE FROM JULY 1942 TO JULY 1943

Author Affiliations

Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital; Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard University BOSTON

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1944;73(2):154-197. doi:10.1001/archinte.1944.00210140044006
Abstract

CLINICAL ASPECTS (CONTINUED) 

Intestinal Obstruction.  —The detailed physiology of intestinal ileus continues to receive attention, and a study by Oppenheimer and Mann263 was undertaken to determine the role of intestinal capillary circulation during varying degrees of intraluminal pressure, with particular regard to intestinal viability. Definite capillary patterns were seen in expermiental obstruction, and it appeared that intraparietal capillary flow ceases when the intraluminal pressure reaches a level of about 60 mm. of mercury. Lower pressures produce little or no change in the intraparietal capillary circulation. Reactive hyperemia followed deflation in all the experiments, and it was noted that angulation or twisting of extramural vessels resulted in cessation of capillary flow at the lower values of distending pressure (less than 30 mm.).Evans264 presents studies on shock in intestinal strangulation, with particular observations on loss of plasma. He emphasizes the earlier studies of Blalock, who

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