[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1944

USE OF A SYNTHETIC DIET FOR FOOD ALLERGY AND TYPHOID

Author Affiliations

With the Technical Assistance of Marjorie Jorgenson St. LOUIS

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1944;73(4):341-348. doi:10.1001/archinte.1944.00210160073008
Abstract

An attempt has been made to construct a diet for man as nearly as possible free of natural foods and composed of nutritional factors in chemically pure form. The need for such a diet may occur in three conditions. First, since a mixture of amino acids is not antigenic, one may support normal nutrition for persons with severe food allergy and at the same time determine whether food plays an important role in the manifestations of allergy exhibited by the patient. When the patient is allergic to food, the feeding of such a diet should result in definite improvement. Secondly, mixtures of amino acids and dextrose, since they are both crystalline, are rapidly absorbed in the upper portion of the intestinal tract. Pure fats may be emulsified so that they can be absorbed as rapidly as natural ones. Thus, when there is ulceration of the lower part of the intestinal

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×