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Article
September 1944

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE DEEPER ANATOMIC CHANGES IN LYMPHOID DISEASES

Author Affiliations

General Director of Laboratories, Department of Hospitals, City of New York NEW YORK

From the Laboratories of Pathology, Bellevue Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1944;74(3):163-171. doi:10.1001/archinte.1944.00210210010002
Abstract

The term lymphoid diseases is used in this paper to designate an isolated group of interrelated diseases composed of lymphogenous leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, giant follicular lymphadenopathy, lymphosarcoma and the gastrointestinal so-called pseudoleukemia of Briquet. The object of this paper is to point out the frequency with which these diseases originate in the deeper lymphoid structures, notably in the lymph nodes of the abdomen, and the secondary significance of enlargement of the superficial nodes, when it occurs at all. If the lymphoid diseases as a group have been previously considered from this standpoint I am not aware of it. In any event, it appears to be a matter of concern both to the clinician and to the pathologist whether enlargements of superficial lymph nodes are preponderant or "primary" factors in lymphoid diseases or externalizations of preponderant or "primary" changes in the lymph nodes of the abdomen or thorax or both, in

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