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Article
September 1945

GALLBLADDER DYE (IODOPHTHALEIN SODIUM)EFFECT OF INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS ON CORONARY FLOW, BLOOD PRESSURE AND BLOOD COAGULATION

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(3):143-145. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210330014003
Abstract

The dangers of intravenous cholecystography have been cited in the literature since 1925. At this time, Graham, Cole and Copher1 noted the incidence and symptoms of various disturbances occurring in connection with the use of intravenous injections of gallbladder dye. Palmer and Ferguson,2 in 1933, reviewed the literature on reactions and contraindications to intravenous cholecystography. Their conclusion was that the chief contraindications are cardiovascular (cardiac decompensation and angina pectoris or coronary sclerosis). In 1938, Lutz and Seyfried3 published an article on corroboration by autopsy of a clinical diagnosis of sudden heart failure in the presence of coronary sclerosis in a 68 year old man who had been given gallbladder dye intravenously a few minutes before death. The conclusion of Lutz and Seyfried was that intravenous cholecystography is contraindicated in hypertonia

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