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Article
October 1945

CLINICAL SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY EMBOLISM

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; BOSTON

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(4):234-238. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210340048007
Abstract

It has been known for some time, but not generally appreciated, that pulmonary embolism may simulate many other conditions. Over thirty years ago attention was called to the fact that pulmonary embolism might be confused with pleurisy,1 angina pectoris2 and lobar pneumonia.3 Since then the similarity between pulmonary embolism and other commonly accepted syndromes has been casually referred to in statistical studies or in individual case reports.4 White5 has pointed out that unexplained fainting, prostration, dyspnea, tachycardia, fever or jaundice should suggest the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

Failure to recognize the many clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism may lead to erroneous diagnosis and prevent application of proper therapeutic and prophylactic procedures. In order to gain a more comprehensive view of the total clinical picture of pulmonary embolism than is now available, all cases at the Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, from 1929 to 1942, inclusive, with

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