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Article
November 1945

STREPTOMYCIN FOR CERTAIN SYSTEMIC INFECTIONS AND ITS EFFECT ON THE URINARY AND FECAL FLORA

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Jefferson Medical College and Hospital (Dr. Reimann and Dr. Price) and the Wyeth Institute of Applied Biochemistry (Dr. Elias).

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1945;76(5):269-277. doi:10.1001/archinte.1945.00210350015003
Abstract

Streptomycin, an antibiotic substance derived from Actinomyces griseus, when injected parenterally appears in the blood, urine and spinal fluid in amounts theoretically bacteriostatic or bactericidal for certain gram-negative bacilli known to be resistant to penicillin and to sulfonamide compounds.1 When given orally, only traces appear in the blood and urine, since most of it is excreted in the feces, where it exerts a suppressive effect on various bacteria. It is relatively nontoxic. These facts, together with suggestive evidence of the therapeutic value of streptomycin in several cases of typhoid1a and in experimental infections in animals,2 warrants further trial of the drug in several directions; namely, (a) for more patients with typhoid; (b) for infections caused by gram-negative bacilli, especially brucellosis, bacillary dysentery, tularemia, plague, cholera and Escherichia coli and Hemophilus influenzae infections; (c) for infections of the urinary tract, and (d) to study its effect on the

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