[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1946

Experimental Studies on the Vasomotor Innervation of the Retinal Arteries (Tr. by Robert Fraser).

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1946;78(3):368. doi:10.1001/archinte.1946.00220030115007

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Much interest and some controversy have arisen in the past over the question as to whether or not the retinal arteries and those of the brain behave physiologically alike in all respects. The author by carefully controlled and ingenious experiments has probably demonstrated that they do.

The experimental work, that is carefully detailed, had for its objective the elucidation of the vasomotor innervation of the retinal arteries and the relation of this innervation to the circulation in the other parts of the organism, particularly in the brain. It showed, among other things, that the retinal arteries are not directly controlled by the vasosensory nerves and are not subject to the regulation of the universal circulation. In fact, the retinal arteries, in the experiments, behaved precisely as do the cerebral arterioles of the same order of magnitude.

One of the most interesting chapters is that having to do with the relation

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×