[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1947

COINCIDENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS AND HYPOPITUITARISM

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; ALBANY, N. Y.; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; ALBANY, N. Y.

From the departments of neuropsychiatry and pathology of the Albany Medical College and Albany Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;79(3):322-332. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220090082005
Abstract

THE INFLUENCE of the endocrine glands other than the pancreas on diabetes has been studied extensively. While the pancreas has always been the focus of research efforts, the modifying effects of other endocrine glands, notably the thyroid and adrenal glands, have also been considered of great importance. The research of Houssay and his associates1 and of many other workers during the past fifteen years on the interrelationships of the pituitary, adrenal and pancreas' is well known. The disease diabetes mellitus responds sensitively, either for better or for worse, to changes in the pituitary and adrenal. These changes may be artificially produced either by operation on the two glands or by injection of their hormones. The classic animal with the Houssay phenomenon is one in which diabetes has been produced by pancreatectomy and subsequently alleviated by hypophysectomy. An almost identical phenomenon can be produced by

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×