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Article
April 1947

SEPTIC STAPHYLOCOCCEMIA SUCCESSFULLY TREATED BY PENICILLIN AND BACTERIOPHAGE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Bacteriology and the Department of Medicine, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;79(4):391-400. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220100041003
Abstract

SEPTIC staphylococcemia, its complications and sequelae have been a major problem for study by our group for many years. Several papers have appeared from time to time dealing with the use of bacteriophages in many hundreds of patients and presenting in detail the therapeutic program in some of the more serious clinical varieties of this infection, such as osteomyelitis, septic thrombosis of the cavernous sinus, staphylococcic meningitis and staphylococcic endocarditis. The introduction of the sulfonamide drugs and subsequently of penicillin was followed by their enthusiastic use against staphylococcic infections, with success in many instances. More recently, streptomycin is being employed against the staphylococcus because of the well known but inadequately discussed failures in sulfonamide and penicillin therapy of infections with resistant staphylococci. At this time we wish to present the record of a patient with fulminant septic staphylococcemia, apparently complicated by localization on the endocardium and in the lumbar portion

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