[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1947

INCIDENCE AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN DIABETES MELLITUS

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Medicine, Tufts College Medical School, Associate in Medicine, Beth Israel Hospital; Assistant Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Pathologist, Beth Israel Hospital; Instructor in Medicine, Tufts College Medical School BOSTON

From the Diabetic Clinic and the Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;80(4):463-474. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220160042004
Abstract

THE INCIDENCE of coronary artery disease in diabetic persons has been investigated repeatedly at autopsy, with general agreement that severe coronary arteriosclerosis is more frequent in the diabetic than in the nondiabetic patient.1 Of 316 patients with diabetes over the age of 40 included in the report of Root, Bland, Gordon and White,1a 38.2 per cent of the men and 32.2 per cent of the women had coronary artery occlusions. The same study demonstrated such occlusions in only 9.9 per cent of 1,521 nondiabetic men and in 4.9 per cent of 789 nondiabetic women, all over the age of 40. In the same age group Enklewitz1b found coronary artery occlusions in 31.8 per cent of 261 persons with diabetes.

In the hearts of a group of unselected patients studied by an improved technic of injection plus dissection for the detection of pathologic alterations in the coronary arteries,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×