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Article
October 1947

EFFECTS ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM OF FLUIDS ADMINISTERED INTRAVENOUSLY IN MANV. Function of Cutaneous Capillaries and Lymphatic Vessels

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Service and Medical Research Laboratories, Beth Israel Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;80(4):491-495. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220160070006
Abstract

EARLIER studies from this and other laboratories1 have yielded data on the nature of the changes in the dynamics of the circulation in patients receiving infusions of electrolytes intravenously. All authors agree that such infusions increase blood volume, raise venous and intra-auricular pressures and increase cardiac output; changes in arterial pressure are variable. There are, however, no data available on changes in the function of small vessels during the course of intravenous infusions in man, and it was therefore considered of interest to make the present study.

MATERIAL AND METHODS  Seven men, 16 to 58 years old, were studied; none had any evidence of cardiovascular disease. Each received an infusion into an antecubital vein of 1,800 cc. of isotonic solution of sodium chloride or 5 per cent dextrose in isotonic solution of sodium chloride; the rates of infusion were between 60 and 85 cc.

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