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Article
October 1947

SENSITIVITY OF SKIN TO HISTOPLASMIN IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF PULMONARY DISEASE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY; In Cooperation with; Chief of Medical Service, Medical Corps, United States Army; Chief of Laboratory Service, Medical Corps, Army of the United States; Chief of Tuberculosis Section, Medical Corps, Army of the United States; Chief of X-ray Service, Medical Corps, Army of the United States; Chief of Bacteriology Section, Sanitary Corps, Army of the United States

From the Moore General Hospital, Swannanoa, N. C.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1947;80(4):496-513. doi:10.1001/archinte.1947.00220160075007
Abstract

DURING the period of rapid demobilization of the United States Army following cessation of hostilities, many soldiers were found to have roentgenologic evidence of pulmonary pathema. This was discovered at routine physical examination during the process of their separation from the Service. More than 1,500 patients were sent to the Moore General Hospital from various separation centers over the country because of roentgenologic evidence of pulmonary disease. Most of them were asymptomatic. Their sputum on repeated examinations was negative for acid-fast organisms in more than 50 per cent of the cases. Of the total number, 3.5 per cent had a negative reaction to the cutaneous test for tuberculin. For the most part, these patients were to be observed for a period of at least six months. This period of observation was necessary to determine the presence of activity. All patients were considered to have pulmonary tuberculosis until it was proved

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