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Article
March 1948

NEUROCIRCULATORY ASTHENIA, ANXIETY NEUROSIS OR THE EFFORT SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

BOSTON; CHICAGO

From the medical clinic and the Cardiac Research Laboratory of the Massachusetts General Hospital, the departments of medicine and diseases of the nervous system, Harvard Medical School, and the Fatigue Laboratory, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1948;81(3):260-281. doi:10.1001/archinte.1948.00220210014002
Abstract

THE PURPOSE of this paper is to summarize some of the conclusions and data from a comprehensive study of patients with neurocirculatory asthenia, anxiety neurosis or the effort syndrome.1 These studies were conducted over a five year period1a (1942 to 1947), for the most part on service personnel. It is intended that this summary should be of use to those who are now handling or studying problems associated with this disorder. Although most of the important investigations on the subject have been made during and immediately after wars,2 the problem of neurocirculatory asthenia is important in civilian life. In this paper we shall emphasize the data from our studies and the conclusions of the authors and shall not attempt to summarize the abundant literature on neurocirculatory asthenia; nor will we attempt to present in detail all the studies of the project, as they are being reported

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