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Article
March 1948

PLACE OF INTERMITTENT VENOUS HYPEREMIA IN THE TREATMENT OF OBLITERATIVE VASCULAR DISEASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine and St. Luke's Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1948;81(3):292-300. doi:10.1001/archinte.1948.00220210046004
Abstract

IN A PREVIOUS communication, Hick, Coulter and one of us1 summarized the reasons which prompted the use of intermittent venous hyperemia in cases of obliterative vascular disease. At that time (1937) the number of patients who had used this treatment was small, and they had not used the method originally advocated by Collens and Wilensky2 for a long time. The conclusions were tentative.

The rationale of this treatment has remained controversial, and there are still a number of vascular clinics in which its efficacy is doubted.3 Others employ it when the extremity is obviously lost and waste valuable time or hasten the absorption of toxins from gangrenous toes.

The purpose of this communication is to present our indications for this form of treatment and the results obtained from it. This report is based on 100 consecutive unselected cases taken from the office files, and it excludes

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