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Article
March 1948

HETEROPHILE ANTIBODY TITER IN DISEASES OTHER THAN INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS

Author Affiliations

Resident in Pathology, Research Hospital KANSAS CITY, MO.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1948;81(3):328-333. doi:10.1001/archinte.1948.00220210082007
Abstract

TO DATE, the heterophile antibody or Paul-Bunnell test has been considered one of the few specific laboratory tests, most investigators stating that only infectious mononucleosis, serum sickness or injections of liver can cause a diagnostic agglutination titer of 1:32 or higher by the Paul-Bunnell method or of 1: 56 or higher by the more commonly used Davidsohn modified technic.1

In the laboratory of Research Hospital, my colleagues and I have in the past twenty-three months made a total of five hundred and three tests on 220 different patients, using exclusively the Davidsohn technic, with readings taken after overnight incubation in the refrigerator. Since many of these tests have been done on outpatients whose complete records were not accessible, the study is limited to 141 patients, representing only those for whom diagnosis was made after examination of tissue either on their admission to Research Hospital or on their examination at the

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