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Article
January 1949

EFFECTS OF SALICYLATES AND BENADRYL ON EXPERIMENTAL ANAPHYLACTIC HYPERSENSITIVE VASCULAR AND CARDIAC LESIONS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Experimental Medicine and the Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Medical School and Wesley Memorial Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1949;83(1):48-66. doi:10.1001/archinte.1949.00220300056003
Abstract

IT IS WIDELY accepted that rheumatic fever is a disease of the heart, blood vessels and joints. The exact cause is not known, but the theory of allergy is attractive and supported by clinical, anatomic, bacteriologic and immunologic observations. A great deal of experimental work has been done in the study of anaphylactic hypersensitive reactions in animals. The early work will be found described in the papers of Klinge,1 Vaubel,2 Knepper and Waaler,3 and Knepper.4 In 1943 Rich and Gregory5 also demonstrated that lesions having basic characteristics of periarteritis nodosa could be produced in rabbits by the intravenous injection of sterile normal horse serum. Additional observations by these workers6 revealed that anaphylactic hypersensitive reactions produced cardiac lesions which were morphologically similar to those of rheumatic carditis. Since Rich and Gregory pointed out this similarity, several papers7 have

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