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Article
February 1950

OBSERVATIONS ON THE PHYSIOLOGIC EFFECTS OF CORTISONE AND ACTH IN MAN

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine (Drs. Sprague, Hench, Slocumb and Polley); the Division of Biochemistry (Drs. Power, Mason and Kendall); the Endocrinology Laboratory, Section on Clinical Physiology (Dr. Albert), and the Division of Clinical Laboratories (Dr. Mathieson), Mayo Clinic and Foundation.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;85(2):199-258. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230080003001
Abstract

UNTIL recently inadequate supplies of the adrenal cortex hormone 17-hydroxy-11-dehydrocorticosterone1 (formerly known as "compound E" and hereinafter called "cortisone") and pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (hereinafter called "ACTH") have limited studies of the effects of these substances in man when administered in amounts sufficient to have pronounced physiologic activity. With the development and improvement of methods for partial synthesis of cortisone and for the separation of larger amounts of ACTH from the pituitary glands of animals, adequate amounts of both materials became available for trial in certain diseases of human beings. A great impetus was given to their production by recent observations concerning their favorable influence on the course of a common chronic disease (rheumatoid arthritis) as well as in a common acute disease with serious chronic sequelae (acute rheumatic fever).2 In the short time since these observations were made, increasing amounts of these hormones have become available and, although

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