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Article
February 1950

RELATION BETWEEN BLOOD LIPIDS AND EXCRETION OF CHOLINE IN DIABETIC PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

From the Department of Metabolic Research, Wenner-Grens Institute, Stockholm University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;85(2):272-279. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230080076004
Abstract

THE INCREASE of blood lipid fractions, diabetic-hyperlipemia, is a well known sign of the abnormal fat metabolism which takes place in a system affected with diabetes mellitus.

The blood lipids can be divided into three groups, composed of (1) neutral fat, (2) phospholipids and (3) cholesterol. Recent studies seem to indicate that practically all phospholipids contain choline,1 that is to say, they are composed of sphingomyelin and, mainly, of lecithin. Choline is regarded as an important dietary factor, playing an essential role in fat metabolism.2 In this laboratory the excretion of choline in the urine of persons with diabetes was investigated, and an increased choline output was found in some instances.3 In continuing these investigations, the relationship between the amount of choline excreted in the urine and the diabetic lipemia has been studied.

MATERIAL  Twelve patients with diabetes, 5 men and 7 women, ranging in age from

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