[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.176.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1950

CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF SUBSTANCES EFFECTIVE IN TREATMENT OF PARKINSONISM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Neurology of the Harvard Medical School; the Neurological Unit of the Boston City Hospital, and the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1950;85(2):284-298. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230080088006
Abstract

IN 1882 GNAUCK1 discovered the effectiveness of hyoscine in palliation of the symptoms of parkinsonism and opened the present era of medical therapy in that disease. In the next half century or more little was added besides the demonstration of similar action by the other alkaloids in the solanaceous group, atropine and hyoscyamine; extracts of the stramonium leaf,2 and preparations of other plants containing the mydriatic alkaloids.3 No one drug or combination of drugs has established its supremacy over the others because of the notoriously variable manifestations of the disease and pattern of response to therapy, which is constant only in the definite residue of obvious symptomatology following optimal medication.4 In addition to certain drugs with limited application, such as amphetamine sulfate, occasionally useful in the postencephalitic syndrome, a wide assortment of compounds with nonspecific effect have been reported on, including barbiturates, salicylates,5 and vitamins.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×